One of our highlights of 2016 was without question PrintStool by Munich based designer Thorsten Franck for German manufacturer Wilkhahn. Less because of the object itself and more because of what it represents: the first step by a major furniture producer towards industrial 3D furniture printing. We met up with Thorsten in Munich to discuss PrintStool, 3D printing and the changing role of designers.

PrintStool by Thorsten Franck for Wilkhahn, here as seen at NeoCon Chicago 2016

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PrintStool by Thorsten Franck for Wilkhahn, here as seen at NeoCon Chicago 2016

Whereas 3D printing is omnipresent in the media, and a ubiquitous tool in contemporary research and development, in most daily

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Graph by Jehs+Laub for Wilkhahn

Although Stuttgart based design studio Jehs+Laub are in many respects best known as the winners of the inaugural Moormann Bookinist

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Presto by Thorsten Franck for Wilkhahn, as seen at NeoCon Chicago 2016

At the risk of getting political, the term “neoconservative”/”neocon” hasn’t always had the best reputation, especially not in Europe where

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Orgatec 2012 Stand-up Thorsten Franck Wilkhahn

Anyone who had anything to do with the UK childrens toy market of the 1970s – either as a user

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Because our article on the new London bus has been delayed by a broken water main at Tooting Bec, we’ve

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